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Tired Eyes No More at Dr. Tavel

POSTED ON October 1, 2010

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As a Graphic Designer, Facebook junkie and most recently, Dr. Tavel blogger, it is no mystery that I spend hours of my day in front of a computer screen. As a matter of fact, it seems like the only break that I get from the computer is my commute home in the evening (in which I wear my Drivewear sunglasses since I am driving westbound). Needless to ...

As a Graphic Designer, Facebook junkie and most recently, Dr. Tavel blogger, it is no mystery that I spend hours of my day in front of a computer screen. As a matter of fact, it seems like the only break that I get from the computer is my commute home in the evening (in which I wear my Drivewear sunglasses since I am driving westbound).
Needless to say, by 9 pm, my eyes are typically fried leaving me feeling tired and fatigued without really doing many physical activities.

Since I work for the best eye doctor, Dr. Tavel, I went to one of our Indianapolis eye care centers and spoke with one of our board certified optometrists. She told me that I was suffering from eye fatigue, due to long hours in front of the computer.  While I was there, I went ahead and got my annual eye examination. Overall, my vision had not changed drastically and wasn’t causing the fatigue-the screens were! She recommended glasses with anti-fatigue lenses.

I now wear my computer glasses with Kodak Anti-Fatigue lenses when I know that I will be sitting in front of the computer for more than 2 or 3 hours.  What a difference! I’ve noticed that I am having fewer headaches and that I don’t feel as drained. I recommend anti-fatigue lenses for anyone spending long hours in front of the computer which is many of us.

Because of my own eye strain, I checked up on common eye strain facts and solutions.

• 91% of office computer users reported eyestrain to be a common work related problem.
• A vast majority of workers, from receptionists to company presidents, spend a good part of each day working at a computer.
• Computer monitors are generally 19” to 24” from the user, creating additional eyestrain and fatigue problems especially for workers over 40.
• Glare from overhead lighting and reflections from papers on the desk and the computer monitor itself make the problems associated with the computer even more pronounced for worker’s who wear glasses.
• The height of the monitor may force older worker’s to assume uncomfortable posture in order to see over (or through) their bifocal lenses.

All these problems have simple solutions!

• Annual eye examinations will assure that employees are working with optimum vision.
• Special “computer glasses”, determined by monitor placement and the worker’s prescription, will make focusing on the computer screen more comfortable.
• Special bifocal placement, determined by monitor position will make viewing the computer screen more ergonomic.
• Special lens treatments (anti-fatigue lenses!) will reduce glare and reflections on worker’s glasses, thus dramatically reducing eyestrain and errors, while increasing productivity.

*According to Allaboutvision.com

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