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Thin and Tough Eyewear for Kids: Polycarbonate Lenses

POSTED ON December 21, 2010

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When I say “TNT” what comes to mind? A highly explosive material? A cable TV channel? How about children’s eyewear? Dr. Tavel and his board certified associates have their own definition of TNT: thin and tough eyewear for kids. Kids and glasses don’t always mix. It can be difficult to find lenses that withstand the demands of a child’s active lifestyle. Here’s the answer: polycarbonate lenses. These aren’t your everyday lenses. Polycarbonate lenses were developed by the aerospace industry for use in helmet visors. ...

When I say “TNT” what comes to mind? A highly explosive material? A cable TV channel? How about children’s eyewear?

Dr. Tavel and his board certified associates have their own definition of TNT: thin and tough eyewear for kids.

Kids and glasses don’t always mix. It can be difficult to find lenses that withstand the demands of a child’s active lifestyle. Here’s the answer: polycarbonate lenses.

These aren’t your everyday lenses. Polycarbonate lenses were developed by the aerospace industry for use in helmet visors. This material is also found in bulletproof windows and airplane windows. Polycarbonate lenses are 10 times more impact-resistant than glass or plastic lenses. They exceed the FDA’s requirements by over 40 times. They are kid-friendly lenses that many Indiana vision centers suggest like Dr. Tavel Family Eye Care. Children's Eye Wear

The polycarbonate material is lighter than plastic or glass, so they don’t constantly slide down the nose. They are also about 20 percent thinner which allows for slimmer, less pronounced lenses giving many children and active adults the look they want in their glasses.

Although polycarbonate lenses won’t shatter, they are more prone to scratching, so scratch-resistant coating is essential.

An added benefit of polycarbonate lenses for kids is that they are a natural UV filter and block over 99 percent of harmful UV rays. According to AllAboutVision.com, over 80 percent of a person’s UV exposure happens by age 18 so it’s important to protect your child’s eyes at an early age. These lenses can help.

In addition to giving your child safe glasses, be sure to provide them with safe toys. Prevent Blindness America has declared December “Safe Toys and Gifts Month” to encourage everyone to make conscientious decisions about their child’s safety especially in this gift giving month.  Toys should be appropriate for a child’s age and if needed adult supervision should accompany play with the toy.

It’s important for children’s eye wear to protect their eyes and for their toys to be safe.   So think thin and tough with eyewear for kids!

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