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Take This Fireworks Safety Quiz

POSTED ON July 1, 2011

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Children under 15 years of age accounted for approximately 40 percent of the estimated 8,600 fireworks-related injuries in 2010. Read below for a Fireworks Safety Quiz courtesy of Prevent Blindness America. If your child was hit in the eye, would you know what to do? 1.  Glass or metal from a bottle rocket strikes a child’s eye.  There is no bleeding, and the pain goes away quickly.a. Ignore it. There is nothing wrong. b. Apply ointment or rinse out the eye. c. Take the child to the emergency room.Answer: c. ...

Children under 15 years of age accounted for approximately 40 percent of the estimated 8,600 fireworks-related injuries in 2010.

Read below for a Fireworks Safety Quiz courtesy of Prevent Blindness America.

If your child was hit in the eye, would you know what to do?

1.  Glass or metal from a bottle rocket strikes a child’s eye.  There is no bleeding, and the pain goes away quickly.

  • a. Ignore it. There is nothing wrong.
  • b. Apply ointment or rinse out the eye.
  • c. Take the child to the emergency room.

Answer: c. Get the child to the emergency room. An impact injury, caused by something slamming into the eye, can lead to damage that your child cannot immediately feel and you cannot see. Vision loss, even blindness, could occur within hours or days. Only an Indiana eye doctor’s examination of the interior eye can reveal the result of an impact injury.

2.  After an accident, the child is in terrible pain and wants to rub the eye. What should you do?

  • a. Let the child rub the eye.
  • b. Do not let the child rub the eye and go immediately to the emergency room.
  • c. Give a pain reliever as soon as possible.
  • d. Apply ointment right away.

Answer: b. Do not let the child rub the eye. Rubbing the eye may increase bleeding or worsen the injury.

3.  The child’s eye has been hit by an exploding bottle rocket, sparkler or another type of fireworks device. First:

  • a. Tape or secure some type of protective patch against the bones around the eye area and go  immediately to the emergency room.
  • b. Apply ointment right away.
  • c. Rinse out the eye right away.

Answer: a. Tape or hold a protective shield against the bones surrounding the eye. Do not apply pressure to the eye itself. Using a foam cup or the bottom of a paper juice carton are just two tips. Protecting the eye from further contact with any item, including the child’s hand, is the goal.

4.  What is the best pain reliever to give to the child on the way to the hospital?

  • a. Aspirin.
  • b. An ibuprofen-based pain reliever.
  • c. Do not stop for pain relief medication.

Answer: c. Don’t stop for medication. Over-the-counter pain relievers will not do much to alleviate pain.

Aspirin (which should never be given to children) or ibuprofen can thin the blood, increasing bleeding. Take the child to an emergency room right away; this is more important than stopping for a pain reliever.

5. Which of these is the wrong thing to do for a child’s injured eye?

  • a. Apply ointment.
  • b. Keep the child calm.
  • c. Tape a patch against the bones surrounding the eye.

Answer: a. Do NOT apply ointment. Ointment makes the area around the eye slippery and harder for the doctor to examine. Ointment may also not be sterile.

6.  Your child’s friends are going to set off fireworks, and your child wants to play too. You:

  • a. Remember that bottle rockets can stray off course or throw shrapnel when they explode.
  • b. Keep in mind that about half of all fireworks injuries happen to bystanders.
  • c. Insist that the child avoid fireworks and take him or her to a professional fireworks display.

Answer: a-c. All of the answers are correct.

Dr. Tavel encourages you to celebrate safety this holiday weekend!

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