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Pretty Eyes are Healthy Eyes

POSTED ON December 7, 2010

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Hypoallergenic is a buzzword in the cosmetic industry. Products that boast this title claim to be safer for your skin and cause less allergic reactions. As a veteran contact lenses wearer, here’s the question I pose: Are hypoallergenic cosmetics really safer for your eyes? The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants consumers to know that no federal standards exist governing the use of the term. The decision to label a cosmetic “hypoallergenic” lies with the manufacturer. This makes me a little weary of the hypoallergenic term, so ...

Hypoallergenic is a buzzword in the cosmetic industry. Products that boast this title claim to be safer for your skin and cause less allergic reactions.

As a veteran contact lenses wearer, here’s the question I pose: Are hypoallergenic cosmetics really safer for your eyes?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants consumers to know that no federal standards exist governing the use of the term. The decision to label a cosmetic “hypoallergenic” lies with the manufacturer.

This makes me a little weary of the hypoallergenic term, so I did research of my own and found several easy steps you can take to ensure proper eye health when using cosmetics and wearing contact lenses: Eye Makeup

  • Mascara: Use water-based mascara that is oil-free and fragrance-free. Avoid mascaras with fibers for extra lash length since the fibers may flake off and fall into the eye. Take caution when applying mascara. Damage from mascara wands can lead to serious infections.
  • Eyeliner: Use water-based eyeliner and don’t apply it inside the upper or lower eyelid.
  • Eyeshadow: Use cream shadows instead of powders and avoid shadows with glitter.
  • Eye makeup remover: Take out your contact lenses before removing your makeup. Use only oil-free and fragrance-free removers.

You can also protect your eyes by never sharing cosmetics with friends. If you develop an eye infection, throw out all your old makeup because contaminated makeup could re-infect your eye. Also, it’s important to replace all eye makeup every three months. And of course, get your annual eye examination from an Indiana eye care doctor like Dr. Tavel and his board certified associates.

Just because a product is labeled hypoallergenic doesn’t necessarily mean it’s safe for your eyes.  Good information to know!

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