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How to Get Straight A’s in Eyewear Care

POSTED ON August 2, 2011

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Post by guest blogger Joshua Yates, manager at Dr. Tavel Family Eye Care in Zionsville Kids are great but they don’t really understand the value of something.  When a kid picks up their first pair of glasses, I go through a whole teaching lecture to help them understand how to take care of the glasses. Number one is how to clean the glasses.  NO paper products including Kleenex – only 100% cotton.  ABSOLUTELY NO Windex or other harsh chemicals.  A Dr. Tavel brand ...

Post by guest blogger Joshua Yates, manager at Dr. Tavel Family Eye Care in Zionsville

Kids are great but they don’t really understand the value of something.  When a kid picks up their first pair of glasses, I go through a whole teaching lecture to help them understand how to take care of the glasses.

Number one is how to clean the glasses.  NO paper products including Kleenex – only 100% cotton.  ABSOLUTELY NO Windex or other harsh chemicals.  A Dr. Tavel brand eyeglass cleaner is preferred but if none is handy some warm water and Dawn dish soap works just fine.  The harshest chemical that should come in contact with your lenses is rubbing alcohol.

Secondly, I explain the two hand rule.  When putting on or taking off glasses it is best to use two hands: one on each side.  This allows for evenly spaced pressure on the arms of the glasses and therefore does not cause any of the pressure points to weaken.  Over time too much pressure can damage soder points and weaken them.  It can also cause the screws that hold the glasses together to loosen and eventually fall out.

Thirdly, I explain that if they do lose a screw or their arm comes off that it is important that they keep all the pieces together so that mom or dad can bring them to us and we can try to fix them.  Ninety-five percent of damaged glasses can be repaired by an optician.  Along with this I say to both the parent and child that regardless of what happens DO NOT EVER use super glue on your glasses.  Once you have used super glue, I can’t do anything to repair the glasses.  What was probably just a five second screw replacement will have become a whole new glasses purchase.

The last thing I tell the child is to remember that if the glasses aren’t on your face they are in your case.  As a last bit of advice I would say to parents to hold your child responsible.  Explain to them the cost of the glasses and how many weeks of their allowance it would take to pay for them if they don’t take care of them and lose them.  Like all of us, if you relate the situation to their wallets the kids listen.

Don’t forget that back to school time is the best time to come see Dr. Tavel for a vision exam.  It’s pretty hard to get those straight A’s if you can’t see the board!

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