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Baby Color Blindness

POSTED ON May 5, 2011

Blog

When expecting a child, parents-to-be have many questions to get answered.  When it comes to vision, they may wonder: Can my child inherit my color blindness? Color blindness (formally called color vision deficiency) is when someone has a difficult time distinguishing between colors.  The colors most commonly affected are shades of red, green, blue or a mix of all three.  The inability to distinguish red and green is most common.  It’s rare to not see any colors at all. The gender statistics for color blindness are ...

When expecting a child, parents-to-be have many questions to get answered.  When it comes to vision, they may wonder: Can my child inherit my color blindness?

Color blindness (formally called color vision deficiency) is when someone has a difficult time distinguishing between colors.  The colors most commonly affected are shades of red, green, blue or a mix of all three.  The inability to distinguish red and green is most common.  It’s rare to not see any colors at all.

The gender statistics for color blindness are drastically different!  One out of 12 men are born color blind, while only one out of 200 women experience the same abnormality.

Color blindness can result from eye injuries, some medications and eye diseases, but is typically caused by genetics.  The gene to blame for color blindness is located on the X chromosome which passes from parent to child.

Photo courtesy of www.bbc-opticians.co.uk

Whether or not your child will be color blind depends on the cause of your deficiency and other genetic factors.

Indiana eye care doctors say early detection is the key to preventing any learning issues your child may experience as a result of color blindness.  Schedule an eye exam with Dr. Tavel and his board certified associates for your child.

Don’t let color blindness hold your child back!

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